Maurice Jarre – Book - Discography / « MAURICE JARRE - Discographie vinyle illustrée » by Jacques Hiver (2011)

The aim of this new topic is to celebrate a great composer Maurice Jarre and at the same time introduce to you a very good friend of mine, Jacques Hiver.

Jacques Hiver met Jarre for the first time when he was 14 years old and since that time he became a very good close friend of one of the most French prolific and versatile film music composer.

Jacques is a playwright and a scriptwriter (plays for the stage, documentaries for radio and TV since 1981). He has produced several albums of Maurice Jarre. He is Knight of the Order of the Arts and Letters.
In 2005, he made some researches for a book which would cover the complete discography (1954 to 2005) of Jarre. Many people brought their friendly cooperation to this book (please refer to the list).The first edition was released in May 2005 with the personal approval of the composer.

Jarre was so touched and impressed by Jacques’ work that he thanked him by a very sensitive dedication. Because of the very high cost of the book, only 10 issues were printed ! Bearing in mind that many fans could not get the book, Jacques released a second edition in 2011 available on “blurb” website (see the link) : “MAURICE JARRE - Discographie vinyle illustrée”. It contains the covers of the LPs discography (1954 to 1991) he could find at the time (covers and pictures in color and black & white : 116 pages) ! Of course, Jacques does not pretend to have included all the covers and he is very eager to get new ones.

Also, the book includes two unreleased interviews of Jarre on his early years with Jean Vilar and the TNP (Théâtre National Populaire) and his appointment as composer for “Lawrence of Arabia”. These interviews were first written for an autobiography of the composer by Jacques Hiver with the help of Christine Authier (Mars 2002). This book is only available in French but if you are familiar with the works of the great legendary composer of “Lawrence of Arabia” and “Doctor Zhivago”, you would not need any translater because the text is very short and understandable easily. It is a great work and a friendly tribute to the composer.

In addition to the above books, Jacques Hiver intends to release two new books. The first will be a revised version of the above one and the second will contain the complete musicography (theatre, concert works, movies and television). Later, There will be a third book that will refer to the latest issues such as CDs, laserdisc, DVD and Blu Ray.

With the friendly permission of Jacques, I have added a text he wrote for the album “Maurice Jarre, Musiques inédites du cinéma français” (Disques Cinémusique, 2011) in which he pointed out this great admiration for his favorite composer and friend.


I met Maurice Jarre for the first time in 1985. Steps from Montmartre. Rue Camille Tahan in Paris. At Mr Leroy’s Home, the copyist of Maurice Jarre’s orchestra sheets. I was 14 years old. Maurice ? He was 34. A lucky coincidence since the son of Mr Leroy was a school friend. At this time, I went regularly to the TNP (Théâtre National Populaire). And I very soon loved his musical scores, which were so surprisingly atypical. Thanks to director Jean Vilar and a group of brilliant young actors (Philippe Noiret, Maria Casarès, Georges Wilson, Daniel Sorano, Jeanne Moreau…), lighting by Saveron and colorful costumes by Gischia, this musical creation offered the idea and perfect equation for an unmatched theatre at Chaillot Theatre (Paris) and Avignon (South East of France).

Since then, I have never ceased following his music with an undisguised fondness. Catching up with them riding the airwaves, or finding them sleeping in the shelves of private and state archives. Systematically buying them when engraved on vinyl grooves and later on compact discs. “Call me Maurice !” he asked me when, too shy, I dared to call him only “Sir”. It was 1997 and I had to produce, with the friendly participation of Melly and Paul Puaux (guardian angels of the “Memory Vilar” in the Maison Jean Vilar, Avignon) and the courageous participation of the Milan Music publisher, his complete works for the TNP. A second CD box “Les Grandes Heures du TNP” would follow. Finally, an American Label specialized in film music released his “Concert Works” after they were – not so surprisingly – rejected in France. Then Maurice commented, parodying the Yankee accent with humor and finesse : “It’s the so delicious exception culturelle française ! Ah, ah !” We had a good laugh.

Today, as Maurice has gone to join David Lean and Jean Vilar, some crazy music lovers – like Clément Fontaine and yours truly – to not want to see falling into oblivion the first creations of one of the brightest stars that ever existed in the film music constellation, in and outside Hollywood. Rediscovering, thanks to Disques Cinémusique and Robert Lafond, the world of this remarkable man, is walking around the ponds of Ville d’Avray with hardy Kruger and Patricia Gozzi on a winter Sunday, in glorious black and white. With, caressing our ears, the musical touch of Maurice Jarre. Poetic and sublime.

Jacques Hiver, 2011.

People that cooperate to the book :

Maurice Jarre

Melly & Paul Puaux
(Association pour une Fondation Jean Vilar)

Gilles Devincre
(Bibliothèque Nationale de France / Département de l’Audiovisuel)

Madame Marie Adès

Eric Farrant

Gilles De La Fournière

Serge et Danièle Champenier

Adilson José De Aquino (São-Paulo)

Wolfgang Jahn (Italian Soundtrack)

Tomomichi (Tokyo)

Institut Nationale de l’Audiovisuel

Prelight Films

Jean-Michel Mart

Thérèse Le Prat

For those interested in Jarre’s works, please refer to :

l Websites :

The Book : « MAURICE JARRE - Discographie vinyle illustrée » :

Jaques Hiver Websites : 

l Music :

Maurice Jarre, Musiques inédites du cinéma français” (Disques Cinémusique, 2011)


Maurice Jarre: Concert Works (1951-1961)

Musiques de scène du T. N. P. ((Théâtre National Populaire).
Réf. Milan Music : 46831-2 (Coffret 3 CD). 46832-2 (Album simple).


Source: filmmusiccomposers
More:   lamorguefiles

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